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In Myosteopractic we recognise that the body works as a whole. All structures (joints, muscles, spine, organs, etc) adapt to physical injury and wear, emotional trauma and stress and/or chemical influences, such as food, toxins and disease. As long as the body is alive, it generates tension as part of an ongoing, dynamic process. The body is continually adapting, breaking down, regenerating, metabolising and rebalancing, both from within and in response to the environment. Tension is a normal part of the body process.

When tension cannot be released, there is generally a problem. Either sustained tension is needed to deal with some imposed problem, or the tension itself is creating a problem.

To assist in the release of this held tension, Myosteopractic applies techniques that are most functional for each structure.

In addition to specific release techniques, the Myosteo-practitioner is trained in dynamic engagement, an integrative approach to the body that goes beyond technique. Dynamic engagement allows tension to be tracked (felt and followed) in the different structures of the body, following which the appropriate techniques may be applied.

The particular value of Myosteopractic lies in its delivery of highly specific techniques within this integrative approach. Tracking the underlying root of the problem, techniques are applied to the spine, joints, neural paths, myofascia, organs, etc, to achieve greater effectiveness for optimal health and performance.

If you are seeking to loosen or mobilise locked areas of your body, or to achieve alignment and balance, then Myosteopractic is for you.

Who would benefit from Myosteopractic?
Myosteopractic benefits people of all ages, from pregnant mothers to babies through to the elderly, whether sick or healthy. Our clients include office workers, full-time moms and professional athletes. Myosteopractic enhances the body's ability to maintain optimum wellness.

How long is a Myosteopractic session and how many sessions would I need?
The length of a Myosteopractic session may vary, as each practitioner works differently. Generally sessions are between half an hour to an hour.
Depending on your condition, an initial series of three to four sessions is usually advised.

Do I need to undress?
No. Myosteopractic is undertaken with the client fully-clothed on a well-supported plinth bed.

Is Myosteopractic registered and does Medical Aid pay?
All practicing Myosteo-practitioners are registered with the Myosteopractic Association of South Africa (MASA).
Myosteopractic does not diagnose and does not claim to fix defects. The modality therefore falls outside of the scope of health care or medical care and consequently is not covered by Medical Aid.
Note: The practice of Myosteopractic does not include diagnosing or treating symptoms of any condition or disease. Myosteopractic does not substitute for any medical or health care attention that may be required

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Steve-Mendonidis-GMyosteopractic comes from the terms myo- (muscle), osteo- (bone) and practic (practice). Literally muscle-bone practice, it is a bodywork system that works with different aspects of the body, integrating a range of functional techniques to achieve optimal health and performance.

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MYOSTEOPRACTIC

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kirsten-sparks02

Kirsten Meyer

Edgemead

+27 84 552 4774
kirsten@myosteo.co.za
www.myosteo.co.za

Wolfy02

Wolfy Borutta

Hout Bay

+27 76 306 0300
wolfy@live.coza

Zack02

Zack Wright

Fish Hoek

+27 84 564 2868 zackofalltradez@gmail.com http://moyacentre.co.za/

Rhoda02

Rhoda Fredericks

Woodstock

+27 72 519 3361

Michael

Michael Phaal

Bergvliet

+27 83 359 0428

Steven02

Steven Bazzea

Longbeach (Fish Hoek)

+27 83 7601183
 steve@alive-wellness.co.za

Gustave02

Gustave Schilbach

Noordhoek

+27 72 229 1835

Daniel-2

Daniel Read

Green Point

+27 79 909 7876

Steve 1

Steve Mendonidis

Plumstead

+27 73 071 7745

Daryn

Daryn Love

Milnerton

+27 72 241 1144
daryn.love@gmail.com

Kirstin

Kirstin Greyling

Greyton

+27 83 4543064

Brendhan

Brendhan Dickerson

Basel, Switzerland

+41 78 698 10 25
http://www.myosteopractic.ch

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PO Box 1234, Sun Valley, 7980, Western Cape, South Africa

infomyosteopractic@gmail.com

 

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Study in MyosteopracticBanner-Pics-2
Study in Myosteopractic provides the opportunity for an exciting career, a lifelong commitment to learning and self-development and a positive way of contributing to society.

The College of Myosteopractic was established in Cape Town in 2006. It offers non-residential courses leading to professional certifications in Myosteopractic.

Myosteopractic is a comprehensive bodywork system requiring commitment to a rigorous training and practice schedule. Practitioner assessments are conducted before qualifying certificates are awarded. Myosteopractic training engages the whole person. The training seeks to develop a practitioner’s perceptive ability, enabling them to engage with their client more effectively.

In addition to learning and practising techniques and their applications, participants are expected to undertake a personal practice of chi kung for the duration of their studies. It is recommended that practitioners continue to engage in chi kung or an equivalent personal practice should they wish to pursue a career in Myosteopractic.

Qualifications
Certificate in Myosteopractic: Modular course. Teaching time: 160 hours; practice time: daily commitment between modules. Ongoing assessment; final assessment; case studies. Please see: Entrance Requirements below.

Please note that this is a serious commitment requiring dedicated class and practice times. It is a professional qualification, and requires more effort and application than most students expect. Those interested are encouraged to talk to graduate students.

Diploma in Myosteopractic: A minimum of one year’s professional practice (seeing a minimum of 12 clients a week) and two advanced seminars. Entrance requirement: Certificate in Myosteopractic.

Higher Diploma in Myosteopractic: A minimum of a further two year’s practice (seeing a minimum of 32 clients a week) and a further two more advanced seminars. Written research project. Entrance requirement: Diploma in Myosteopractic.

Entrance Requirements
The following entrance requirements must be completed before commencing Myosteopractic training:

  • Personal experience of Myosteopractic - minimum of three sessions
  • An interview
  • Approved Anatomy and Physiology
  • Approved Basic Level 1 First Aid

Class Schedule
Certifacate in Myosteopractic basic tuition will be provided in five modules, each of four days duration.

Module 1 & 2 - (1) Landmarks, palpation, structural directions and oscillation - (2) Bilateral skeletal release

  • Module 3 - Cross-release
  • Module 4 - Myofascial release and organ release
  • Module 5 - Practice management, client relations and full system integration

Modules will run Friday to Monday from 09:00 to 17:00. Each module includes in-depth tuition, detailed notes and assessment.

A Certificate of Myosteopractic will be awarded to students following successful completion of all five modules.

Fees

Myosteopractic modules: ZAR 6,000 per module includes tuition, course notes, supervised practice and assessments. Should prospective students request a class outside of the Cape Town area, the travel and accommodation costs will be factored into the module fee.

 

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The seeds of the concept were planted in 1996 through the collaboration of Body Health Practitioner and Mixed Martial Artist, Steve Mendonidis (South African), and Michael Phaal (South African), Body Health Practitioner and Yoga Teacher.

Drawing on his martial arts experience, Steve saw the limitations of focussing a narrow range of techniques on only one structural aspect of the body (eg muscular or skeletal system). Despite these limitations, many contemporary bodywork systems focus in this singular way. Seeking to achieve better and more sustained results with his clients, he began experimenting with a mix of bodywork techniques, focussing on multiple structures of the body.

At the same time, Michael was exploring the development of intuitive tracking systems in his own approach to more functional bodywork.

The Myosteopractic approach was born when the two practitioners began to share their explorations, working on each other, and catalysing a new dynamic in bodywork systems.

Over time, the concepts, principles and techniques of Myosteopractic were developed further, culminating in 2006 with the launch of the College of Myosteopractic in Cape Town. By this time, a growing community of Body Health Practitioners, many of Michael-Phaalwhom were martial artists, could attest to the efficacy and functionality of the Myosteopractic approach.

The system has a unique relationship with contemporary martial arts, sharing many of its fundamental principles. At the time of Steve’s explorations, the Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) system was emerging. This system was formed as traditional martial artists (in karate, judo, wrestling, etc) sought to prove the superiority of their system in the ring. From this testing match MMA was born: a continually evolving mix of the most functional techniques and methods, in all areas (stand up, clinch and ground). Like MMA, Myosteopractic leaves behind the guarded and often territorial approach of traditional bodywork systems in favour of an open system of continual learning, where success is determined by the client alone. The framework underlying this approach is called dynamic engagement.

A key principle of the Myosteopractic system is the whole body approach. This recognises that the body works as a unit and that imbalances frequently move between elements of the body structure (for example, from muscle tension to skeletal misalignment to organ imbalance). The particular success of Myosteopractic lies in its practitioners’ ability to apply functional techniques across a broad range of structures, including muscles, bone structure, ligaments, neural paths and organs.

Due to its success, the system continues to grow in popularity, with certified practitioners graduating each year from the College.